Elbow Pain from Lifting: Root Causes and Treatment

Written by: Nurudeen Tijani

The article below explains the root causes of elbow pain from lifting weights and how to treat and prevent it. However, if you want an immediate solution, you can get instant access to TitaniumPhysique. Our video program will guide you to a pain-free lifting experience. Ready to get started?

3d Illustration of a man with tendonitis elbow pain

KEY TAKEAWAYS


  • Elbow Pain from Lifting: Athletes experience elbow pain when lifting weights due to tight triceps and forearm muscles that strain and inflame the elbow tendons.
  • Causes of Pain: The root causes of this pain are chronic inflammation, lack of magnesium, and muscle tightness.
  • Injuries and Conditions: Elbow issues associated with weight training include tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, triceps tendonitis, and elbow bursitis.
  • Prevention and Cure: To cure and prevent elbow problems, it's essential to keep the triceps and forearm muscles pliable through self-myofascial release exercises.
  • Concerns with Traditional Solutions: Traditional remedies alleviate symptoms without addressing the root cause of the pain. Solutions like the TitaniumPhysique Program are designed to help both prevent and cure elbow problems.

Elbow Pain: Why It Happens and How To Fix It


When you lift weights over time, the triceps and forearm muscles can become restricted, meaning they shorten, tighten, and tense up due to muscular contraction, overuse, and a lack of myofascial release. These tight muscles can then overstretch, strain, and inflame the tendons and tissues around the elbow, resulting in tendon discomfort.

To cure or prevent this condition, prioritize proper form, gradually increase weights, allow adequate rest periods, and, most importantly, maintain pliable triceps and forearm muscles through self-myofascial release (SMR) exercises. These exercises can instantly relieve the restrictions in the muscles and minimize the risk of injury, overuse, and inflammation.

Root Causes of Elbow Pain


Key Points


  1. Inflammatory pain: caused by strain and inflammation of the elbow tendons.
  2. Muscle pain: caused by tense, tight, and restricted triceps and forearm muscles.
  3. Magnesium deficiency: This can lead to both muscle pain and tendon pain.
3D Illustration of man with burning elbow pain, human musculoskeletal system with knotted muscles

Root Cause #1: Tendonitis and Chronic Inflammation


Weight training helps build and strengthen muscles but can also lead to inflammation in tendons, ligaments, and joints. Exercises involving the elbow, such as triceps workouts, bench presses, push-ups, or shoulder presses, can cause inflammation in the elbow tendons and joints. This inflammation causes a 'burning' sensation and pain around the elbow, a condition known as elbow tendonitis.

The burning sensation and pain around the elbow joint are signs of acute inflammation, which is usually temporary and resolves as the body heals the affected tendons. However, if the tendons fail to heal and the pain persists over three months, it is considered a chronic inflammatory condition [1].

When your body's natural healing process doesn't work properly, it can lead to chronic inflammation. This hampers the healing of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. In this case, it leads to chronic elbow tendonitis.

If left untreated, chronic inflammation in the elbow can progress to a degenerative state, causing irreversible deterioration of the elbow joint. Moreover, degenerative tendonitis may increase the risk of autoimmune diseases like arthritis. Athletes and individuals with elbow tendonitis, often experience pain and discomfort during various exercises, including:

Root Cause #2: Magnesium Deficiency


Calcium helps muscles contract, while magnesium aids in relaxation. However, when the body has an excess of calcium, which is often the case, muscles struggle to relax and remain tense. This muscle tension strains the tendons, leading to inflammation and pain, in this case - pain in the elbow joint.

Magnesium also dissolves calcium and prevents the calcification of soft tissues. Calcification occurs when there is excess calcium in the body. Calcification hardens soft tissues like tendons and muscles [2]. In this case, calcification of the triceps and elbow tendons can lead to tendonitis and pain in the elbow joint.

In "The Magnesium Miracle," a scientific reference on the health effects of magnesium, it is highlighted that heavy exercise, physical activity, and factors such as caffeine, stimulants, diuretics, stress, and dehydration can deplete magnesium levels in athletes [3]. Therefore, athletes and individuals in weight training must actively replenish magnesium in their bodies.

40% of magnesium in the body is found in the muscles. Twitching muscles, muscle cramps, and muscle spasms are signs of low magnesium levels in the body.

The Magnesium Miracle - Discover the Missing Link to Total Health, By Carolyn Dean, MD, ND

Root Cause #3: Muscle Restriction


Illustration of knotted trigger points muscles, musculoskeletal pain in human muscle anatomy

During weight training (specifically, exercises involving the elbow), the triceps and forearm muscles contract, becoming tense and tight, eventually losing their elasticity over time [4]. Muscle restriction occurs when these inelastic muscle fibers shorten and cannot relax and return to their normal state.

In the case of elbow pain, lifting weights that are too heavy or using a poor lifting form can lead to overstretching of the triceps and forearm muscles, causing them to become restricted. These circumstances are often the trigger that initiates pain in the elbow. When the triceps and forearm muscles become restricted, they shorten and become tighter.

The tightness in these muscles puts tension on the elbow tendons, leading to inflammation and discomfort. Athletes and gym-goers with restricted triceps and forearm muscles encounter the following symptoms:

  • Severe elbow discomfort while lifting
  • Pain in the elbow when gripping objects
  • Pain when bending, extending, or straightening the arm
  • Sharp forearm pain when lifting

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Elbow Injuries, Conditions, and Symptoms


Key Points


  1. Tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, and triceps tendonitis are distinct types of tendonitis where pain occurs outside, inside, and at the back of the elbow.
  2. Elbow bursitis, also known as bodybuilder's elbow, refers to the inflammation of the elbow bursa, often resulting in the appearance of a big or pointy elbow.

  3. Elbow tendonitis can develop gradually over time (chronic), causing dull and achy pain during lifting. Conversely, it can occur suddenly (acute) from excessive strain on the elbow tendon during lifting, leading to sharp or severe pain after the activity.

  4. Elbow tendonitis refers to the inflammation of the elbow tendon. In contrast, tendinosis involves the degeneration of the elbow tendon's collagen fibers.

Tennis Elbow


Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is caused by inflammation of the forearm extensor tendon, leading to pain on the outer side of the elbow joint. It can develop gradually (chronic) or suddenly due to excessive strain on the tendon (acute).

"Push" exercises such as bench presses, overhead presses, push-ups, pull-ups, tricep dips, and tricep pushdowns can trigger or exacerbate this condition. However, athletes must understand that weight training or physical exercise is not the underlying cause of tennis elbow.

To learn more, I recommend this complete FAQ article on Tennis Elbow.

An illustration of the forearm extensor muscles and tendon

Illustration of tennis elbow and the forearm extensor muscles and tendon. Image Source: Google Images

Nurudeen Tijani working out triceps doing close-grip bench press in gym

Nurudeen performs a close-grip bench press at the gym during a triceps workout (2019). The bench press can strain the forearm extensor tendon and trigger or exacerbate tennis elbow.

Golfer's Elbow


Golfer's elbow, or medial epicondylitis, is caused by inflammation of the medial elbow tendon, leading to pain inside the elbow joint. It can develop gradually (chronic) or suddenly due to excessive strain on the tendon (acute).

"Pull" exercises such as chin-ups, chest flys, bicep curls, lat pulldowns, and cable rows can trigger or exacerbate this condition. However, athletes must understand that weight training or physical exercise is not the underlying cause of golfer's elbow.

To learn more, I recommend this complete FAQ article on Golfer's Elbow.

Illustration of the forearm flexor muscles and golfer's elbow medial epicondylitis

Illustration of golfer's elbow and the forearm flexor muscles and tendon. Image source: Google Images

Nurudeen Tijani working out biceps doing barbell preacher curls in gym

Nurudeen performs barbell preacher curls at the gym during a biceps workout (2019). The bicep curl can strain the medial elbow tendon and trigger or exacerbate golfer's elbow.

Triceps Tendonitis


Triceps tendonitis is inflammation of the triceps tendon, resulting in pain at the back of the elbow. This condition is common among weight-training athletes, primarily due to the repetitive use of the triceps muscle and tendon during weight training.

"Push" exercises such as bench presses, overhead presses, push-ups, tricep dips, overhead tricep extensions, and skull crushers can trigger or exacerbate this condition. However, athletes must understand that weight-lifting is not the underlying cause of triceps tendonitis.

To learn more, I recommend this complete FAQ article on Triceps Tendonitis.

Illustration of posterior elbow pain, tricep tendonitis. Muscles of triceps and triceps brachii tendon

Illustration of the triceps muscle and an inflamed triceps tendon. Image Source: Pressbook British Columbia Campus [5]

Nurudeen Tijani working out shoulder and arms doing shoulder press with barbell in gym

Nurudeen performs seated barbell shoulder presses at the gym (2019). The overhead press can strain the triceps brachii and can trigger or exacerbate triceps tendonitis.

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Elbow Bursitis (Pointy Elbow)


Bodybuilder's elbow refers to a medical condition commonly known as bursitis, which can occur among bodybuilders and individuals involved in weight training. Elbow bursitis (or olecranon bursitis) is the inflammation of the bursa, a small fluid-filled sac that cushions the joint. This condition often results in swelling, tenderness, and pain at the back of the elbow.

Bodybuilders often develop big or pointy elbows due to the strain and injuries they experience from intense workouts, heavy lifting, and repetitive elbow movements.

These repetitive actions can lead to chronic elbow injuries, such as tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, and triceps tendonitis. Over time, these injuries can result in degenerative conditions such as osteoarthritis, autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, tendonitis, and other forms of inflammation.

To learn more, I recommend this FAQ article: Elbow Bursitis - Bodybuilder's Elbow.

The photo on the left shows the left arm of a person with elbow bursitis. The photo on the right is an 3D illustration; a comparison between a normal versus an inflamed olecranon bursa

An illustration of elbow bursitis. The photo on the left shows the left arm of a person with elbow bursitis. The picture on the right is a 3D illustration comparing a normal versus an inflamed olecranon bursa. Image source (left photo): American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons [6]. Right picture: Cleveland Clinic [7].

a side-by-side image of chris dickerson and flex wheeler posing on stage

Photo comparison of Chris Dickerson (left photo) and Flex Wheeler (right image). Chris's elbow tip appears enlarged in comparison to Flex's. Many prominent bodybuilders, including most recently Ronnie Coleman, have been spotted with elbow bursitis. Image source: Encyclopedia of modern bodybuilding, Book by Arnold Schwarzenegger [8].

Elbow Pain Symptoms: Acute vs. Chronic


Acute pain is inflammatory pain experienced during or immediately after lifting. The following symptoms can identify it:

  • Burning pain in the elbow
  • A sensation of heat, redness, soreness, swelling, or tenderness around the elbow

  • Throbbing sensation in the elbow

Inflammation is a natural immune response triggered by the body to combat infections and injuries [9]. Lifting weights that are too heavy or using improper form can strain and injure muscles and tendons, leading to an inflammatory response. Acute elbow inflammation typically lasts a few days to a few weeks.

An injury is considered chronic when the injury does not heal and the pain persists over three months. Depending on the stage of tendonitis [10], athletes with chronic elbow injury experience the following symptoms:

  • Dull and nagging pain in the elbow
  • Discomfort when bending and straightening the arm
  • Stiffness in the elbow joint
  • Sharp, sudden, shooting, severe, or dull ache in the elbow
  • Weak grip strength when lifting dumbbells or barbells

When the body's inflammatory response fails to heal the injury and becomes chronic, it starts a progressive and irreversible deterioration of the elbow tendon, known as degenerative tendinopathy [11].

A comparison of acute vs chronic elbow pain symptoms

Tendonitis vs. Tendinosis


Tendonitis refers to the inflammation of a tendon, resulting in acute inflammatory pain. On the other hand, tendinosis is the deterioration of tendon collagen due to repetitive stress and chronic injury.

Tendinosis leads to a loss of strength in the tendon and can often result in tendon tear or rupture. For instance, consistently lifting with elbow tendonitis (inflammatory pain) can lead to tendinosis (degeneration of the elbow tendon).

When the injury initially occurs, the elbow tendon experiences micro-tear damage, known as tendonitis. As weight training continues, the injury to the tendon worsens and becomes degenerative, known as tendinosis. Ultimately, this progression can lead to the rupture of the elbow tendon. Acute pain indicates tendonitis, while chronic pain suggests tendinosis.

Illustration of elbow tendinopathy | elbow tendon tear

Illustration of tendinosis in the medial and extensor elbow tendon. Source: Google Images

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collage of weightlifting exercises that cause elbow pain - nurudeen tijani performing shoulder press, triceps extension, bench press, triceps kickback, and bicep curl

Treatment Options and Solutions


Key Points


  1. Post-workout elbow pain management involves the RICE Method (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation).
  2. Cold therapy effectively reduces inflammation and supports healing.
  3. Short-term relief remedies like joint supplements and painkillers come with pros and cons. They alleviate symptoms without addressing the root cause of the pain.
  4. Solutions like the TitaniumPhysique Program are designed to help both prevent and cure elbow problems.

Post-Workout Pain Treatment


Elbow pain that occurs after lifting is often an acute inflammatory condition. If you're experiencing pain after lifting and notice any of the following symptoms:

  • Burning pain around the elbow joint
  • A sensation of heat, redness, or swelling around the elbow joint
  • Soreness in the elbow
  • Throbbing sensation in the elbow

The best treatment approach is the RICE Method, which stands for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation [12]Applying ice, also known as cold therapy, to the affected area after a workout helps reduce inflammation and promotes the healing of the inflamed elbow tendon.

Illustration of a man applying ice gel pack on an injured elbow at home

Illustration of a man applying an ice pack to elbow joint to relieve pain - RICE Method

How to Apply Cold Therapy at Home

To apply cold therapy to your elbow at home, follow these steps:

  1. Apply ice or an ice pack to the affected area as soon as possible after your workout.
  2. For the first three days after the onset of post-workout pain symptoms, ice the elbow for 10 to 20 minutes, four to eight times a day. For example, you can try 15 minutes ON, followed by 15 minutes OFF.
  3. Make sure not to apply the ice directly on your skin. Instead, wrap the ice or ice pack in a towel before placing it on your elbow.
  4. You should notice an improvement in your elbow within 48 to 72 hours of using cold therapy as the burning pain, redness, and swelling decrease.

Limitations of the RICE Method

While the RICE method effectively addresses acute inflammatory symptoms, it does not address the root cause of the painAs a result, the pain often returns and worsens upon resuming lifting.

Pros and Cons of Short-Term Solutions


Illustration of painkillers, anti-inflammatory gel, kinesiology tape and elbow sleeve

The image displays Nurudeen wearing elbow sleeves while benching and traditional elbow relief solutions, including painkillers and vitamins, sports tapes, anti-inflammatory gel, and elbow sleeves. Click here to watch the video of Nurudeen benching with elbow sleeves.

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Joint Supplements & Health Vitamins

Individuals often use joint supplements and vitamins to treat tendonitis. They commonly contain Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM) and Chondroitin, which support joint health by aiding cartilage function.

Pros: Joint supplements can provide short-term relief for acute elbow injuries. Incorporating them into a maintenance routine may help prevent tendonitis.

Cons: In my experience of seeking treatment for chronic elbow tendonitis, I tried supplementing with MSM, Chondroitin, Turmeric, and Fish Oil for several years. However, I did not notice any significant relief for my elbow discomfort. These supplements cannot fix the root cause of elbow injuries.

A 2016 study published in Arthritis & Rheumatology found that MSM and Chondroitin did not demonstrate significant benefits in reducing chronic joint pain [13].

Painkillers (NSAIDs)

ProsPeople frequently use nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or painkillers as a treatment for elbow discomfort. They reduce acute inflammation, providing temporary relief from joint pain.

ConsPainkillers only address the symptoms of acute elbow pain and do not target the condition's root cause. Consequently, the pain often returns and persists.

Research indicates that long-term use of NSAIDs can lead to health issues, including gastrointestinal side effects and kidney disease [14].

Joint Injection (Cortisone Shot)

ProsA cortisone shot involves the injection of a steroid medication into the affected joint, such as the elbow joint. The steroid helps provide temporary relief by suppressing inflammatory pain in the joints—the effects of a cortisone shot typically last for three to six months [15].

Cons: The cortisone shot only offers temporary pain suppression. Once the effects of the steroid wear off, the pain and discomfort often return. Repeated cortisone injections can lead to long-term health side effects, including damaged cartilage, joint infection, and nerve damage.

Topical Anti-Inflammatory Remedies (Oil, Cream, Spray, Gel)

ProsTopical tendonitis relief solutions such as pain relief oils, creams, sprays, and gels often contain anti-inflammatory medications like MSM. They can effectively treat acute inflammatory pain, particularly for new elbow injuries.

They can also be beneficial as part of a maintenance routine to help prevent tendonitis. For example, athletes can use lubricants for massaging the triceps and forearm muscles after a workout.

ConsIf your elbow condition is chronic, lasting three months or more, topical pain relief solutions provide little to no relief in reducing the ache. They are unable to address the root cause of the condition. Therefore, they are not effective in treating chronic injuries.

Strength Therapy & Physical Therapy

Unlike tendonitis, tendinosis results in a loss of strength in the elbow tendon and reduced arm mobility.

Pros: Strength therapy is a crucial component of elbow tendinosis treatment. It plays a significant role in healing degenerative tendons and restoring full arm strength and mobility.

ConsPhysical therapy for elbow injuries can be ineffective for many individuals. It is essential to address chronic inflammation, magnesium deficiency, and muscle restriction caused by weight training before focusing solely on elbow strengthening exercises. Skipping these essential steps can render physical therapy ineffective and a waste of time for most people.

Elbow Sleeves, Straps & Braces

Elbow sleeves, straps, and support braces are popular solutions for weight-training athletes with elbow injuries.

ProsThese solutions work by compressing the elbow tendon and joint. This compression can temporarily relieve elbow discomfort when lifting dumbbells or barbells.

Cons: Sleeves, straps, and support braces provide short-term relief by masking the problem without addressing the underlying issue. Using these aids without treating the root cause of the injury can lead to prolonged symptoms and potentially progress to elbow tendinosis, which involves irreversible degeneration of the elbow tendon and joint.

Sports & Kinesiology Tape Therapy

Athletes often use sports tape and KT tape to address tendonitis. They offer support to injured muscles and tendons.

ProsWhen applied correctly, sports tapes can temporarily relieve elbow tendonitis and pain associated with elbow injuries.

Cons: Prolonged use of sports tapes and relying solely on kinesiology therapy can mask the underlying issue, potentially prolonging tendonitis. If left untreated, tendonitis can progress to tendinosis, leading to irreversible degeneration of the elbow tendon and joint.

Pain Relief Patches

There are two types of pain relief patches: medicated and non-medicated.

Medicated patches contain nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medication and are directly applied to the painful area, such as the elbow joint, to alleviate pain. Non-medicated pain relief patches, like nanotech patches, claim to utilize nanotechnology to support the body's natural pain-fighting ability.

Pros - Medicated Patch: Medicated patches can offer short-term relief for elbow tendonitis, with the effects lasting for a few hours.

Cons - Medicated Patch: Medicated patches only provide temporary pain relief and do not address the root cause of tendonitis. Consequently, the underlying issue remains, and the pain may return after resuming training. Medicated patches can also have long-term gastrointestinal side effects.

ProsNanotech Patches: They can be beneficial as part of a maintenance routine to prevent elbow tendonitis, particularly for the post-workout treatment of acute elbow pain.

ConsNanotech Patches: Nanotech patches cannot resolve the root causes of the pain. As a result, they offer limited benefits in reducing chronic pain and discomfort.

Stretching Therapy

Stretching is essential to treating chronic elbow injuries, much like physical therapy.

ProsStretching the forearms and triceps helps elongate these muscles, improving blood flow, nutrient delivery, oxygenation, and waste removal from the muscles and tendons. This function aids in faster healing of elbow injuries. When the triceps, forearm muscles, and elbow tendons are in a healthy and lengthened state, elbow tendonitis and pain will decrease.

ConsSimilar to physical therapy, stretching alone may provide little relief for elbow injuries if used out of step. Before focusing on stretching exercises to treat the pain, it is crucial to address chronic inflammation, magnesium deficiency, and muscle restriction resulting from weight training. Skipping these vital steps can render stretching ineffective for relieving elbow injuries.

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Cure the Root Cause of Tendinopathy Using the TitaniumPhysique Program


The TitaniumPhysique Program is the fastest and most effective way to cure and counteract muscle pain and tendon injuries from weight training. It addresses the root causes:

  • Chronic inflammation
  • Magnesium deficiency
  • Muscle restriction

The program is based on medical research in tendinopathy, sports medicine, sports injuries, musculoskeletal pain treatment and management, supplementation, and nutrition.

By combining research and ten years of experience as a trainer, nutritionist, bodybuilder, and wellness coach, I developed the program for individuals involved in weight training.

To learn more about how this program works and why it effectively heals chronic tendon injuries, I recommend this helpful guide on tendonitis treatment.

Here is an overview of the three steps involved:

  1. Reduce chronic inflammation in the body: Addressing chronic inflammation accelerates the healing process of injuries. Note - although this step is necessary for long-term health, it is not required to cure acute or chronic elbow injuries.
  2. Supplement with magnesium: Replenishing muscle magnesium levels offers numerous benefits, including reducing inflammation and pain, relaxing tense triceps and forearm muscles, and decalcifying the elbow tendon and joint.
  3. Perform triceps and forearm muscle massage: Utilize myofascial pain relief tools such as a massage ball to massage and release tension in the triceps and forearm muscles.

The rest of this article will focus on Step Three of the TitaniumPhysique Program, using self-myofascial release (SMR) to alleviate elbow discomfort.

A collage of steps to treat and cure elbow injuries, including SMR exercise, elbow stretching, and elbow strengthening exercise

Self-Myofascial Release for Elbow Injuries


Step three of the TitaniumPhysique Program involves releasing chronically restricted triceps and forearm muscles using self-myofascial release exercises. This step alone can immediately eliminate pain.

Self-myofascial release uses manual therapy tools (like foam rollers and massage balls) to apply pressure to specific points on the body. It helps release muscle tension, increase muscle elasticity, improve flexibility, and enhance tissue mobility by targeting trigger points in the fascia, the connective tissue around the muscles.

Research by the National Institute of Health confirms the effectiveness of SMR exercises to improve muscle performance and joint range of motion [16].

SMR Tools for Elbow Relief


Myofascial release (SMR) tools, massage balls for muscle pain relief

Massage balls are highly effective in releasing tight muscles and addressing various types of elbow injuries. They are durable and relatively inexpensive to acquire, making them a sustainable solution to tackle and prevent elbow issues.

The peanut ball can release the forearm extensors, triceps muscles, and tendons. The lacrosse ball is ideal for targeting the forearm flexors.

Elbow Relief Exercises


The SMR exercises below can help you relieve tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, or triceps tendonitis. To prevent elbow problems, use a holistic approach and treat the entire forearm and triceps muscle group. For an easy-to-follow video guide, you can access the TitaniumPhysique program.

You will need a peanut ball and a lacrosse ball, found on Amazon or your local sporting goods store.

To fix tennis elbow (pain on the outside of the elbow), use a peanut ball to massage the forearm extensor muscles (click the link to see photo). Lean against a wall and place the peanut ball on the forearm extensor muscles. Roll out (massage) the muscles with the peanut ball for 3-5 minutes. Stretch the forearm extensor muscles.

Perform this routine once a day. Rest the muscle the following day, then repeat the routine. For faster results, perform the exercise twice a day, once in the morning and once at night.

nurudeen tijani performing exercise to fix tennis elbow

Nurudeen demonstrates how to fix tennis elbow using a peanut ball to massage the forearm extensors.

To fix golfer's elbow (pain on the inside of the elbow), use a peanut or lacrosse ball to massage the forearm flexor muscles (click the link to see photo). Sit on a chair next to a table. Place the ball on the table and position your forearm flexor muscles on top of it. Roll out (massage) the muscle with the ball for 3-5 minutes. Stretch the forearm flexor muscles.

Perform this routine once a day. Rest the muscle the following day, then repeat the routine. For faster results, perform the exercise twice a day, once in the morning and once at night.

nurudeen tijani performing exercise to fix golfer's elbow

Nurudeen demonstrates how to fix golfer's elbow using a lacrosse ball to massage the forearm flexors.

To fix triceps tendonitis (pain at the back of the elbow), use a peanut ball to massage the triceps muscle and tendon (click the link to see photo). Sit on a chair next to a table. Place the ball on the table and position your triceps muscle on top of it. Roll out (massage) the triceps muscle and tendon with the ball for 3-5 minutes. Start near your armpit and roll to the triceps tendon above the elbow joint. Stretch the triceps muscle.

Perform this routine once a day. Rest the muscle the following day, then repeat the routine. For faster results, perform the exercise twice a day, once in the morning and once at night.

nurudeen tijani performing exercise to fix triceps tendonitis

Nurudeen demonstrates how to fix triceps tendonitis using a peanut ball to massage the triceps muscle and tendon.

Elbow Strengthening Exercises


Elbow strengthening and mobility exercises help the elbow tendon heal faster and regain maximum strength for optimal performance. These exercises are essential when recovering from elbow tendinosis.

The mobility exercises below can help strengthen the elbow joint:

  • Tricep Overhead Extension (with a resistance band)
  • Tricep Kickback (with a resistance band)
  • Tricep Pushdown and Tricep Pulldown (with a resistance band)
  • Cable One-Arm Tricep Extension (with a resistance band)

For a video demonstration of elbow mobility exercises, click here.

Resources


3. The Magnesium Miracle (Second Edition) - Discover the Missing Link to Total Health, By Carolyn Dean, MD, ND: https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_Magnesium_Miracle_Second_Edition/2lBcDAAAQBAJ

4. Genetics of Muscle Stiffness, Muscle Elasticity and Explosive Strength: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7706646/

6. American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. Elbow (Olecranon) Bursitis.: https://orthoinfo.aaos.org/en/diseases--conditions/elbow-olecranon-bursitis/

8. Arnold, S. (1998). Encyclopedia of Modern Bodybuilding.: https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_New_Encyclopedia_of_Modern_Bodybuild/D-_-St_TPfIC

10. Tendinopathy: Why the Difference Between Tendinitis and Tendinosis Matters: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3312643/

12. What Is the Evidence for Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation Therapy in the Treatment of Ankle Sprains in Adults? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3396304/

13. Combined Treatment With Chondroitin Sulfate and Glucosamine Sulfate Shows No Superiority Over Placebo for Reduction of Joint Pain and Functional Impairment in Patients With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Six‐Month Multicenter, Randomized, Double‐Blind, Placebo‐Controlled Clinical Trial: https://acrjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/art.39819

14. Recognizing the Risks of Chronic Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Use in Older Adults: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158445/

15. What You Should Know About Cortisone Shots: https://www.hss.edu/conditions_cortisone-shots.asp#shot-duration

16. THE EFFECTS OF SELF‐MYOFASCIAL RELEASE USING A FOAM ROLL OR ROLLER MASSAGER ON JOINT RANGE OF MOTION, MUSCLE RECOVERY, AND PERFORMANCE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4637917/

17. The China Study Solution - The Simple Way to Lose Weight and Reverse Illness, Using a Whole-Food, Plant-Based Diet:  https://www.google.com/books/edition/The_China_Study_Solution/nrazCwAAQBAJ

18. Efficacy and Safety of Magnesium for the Management of Chronic Pain in Adults: A Systematic Review: https://journals.lww.com/anesthesia-analgesia/fulltext/2020/09000/efficacy_and_safety_of_magnesium_for_the.20.aspx

19. The Acid Alkaline Balance: https://www.pccmarkets.com/sound-consumer/2009-10/sc0910-acid-alkaline/

20. Treatment of Tendinopathy: What Works, What Does Not, and What is on the Horizon:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2505250/

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    Counteract and prevent elbow pain

    Written by: Nurudeen Tijani

    Nurudeen (aka T.J.) is passionate about helping people build the body they desire through weight training. He is a physique and fitness trainer, nutritionist, yoga instructor, vegan natural bodybuilder, National Physique Committee (NPC) competitor, and founder at TitaniumPhysique. Nurudeen is a member of the International Association Study of Pain (IASP) and the American Chronic Pain Association (ACPA).

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